On This Day in Sports History January 10 | Fueled by Sports
On This Day

On This Day in Sports History January 10

On This Day January 10

NFL

On this day in 1982, AFC Championship game between the Cincinnati Bengals and San Diego Chargers was the second coldest in the history of the NFL in terms of temperature, but the wind chill was 11°F colder than the Ice Bowl, which is the coldest game in NFL history. The temperature was -9°F and the wind-chill was a biting -59°F.

On this day in 2010, the highest scoring playoff game in NFL history took place when the Green Bay Packers traveled to Arizona to play the Cardinals in the Wild Card Round. The game was decided in overtime after Karlos Dansby intercepted a pass from Aaron Rodgers and returned it for a touchdown to give the Cardinals a 51-45 win. The previous record was 95 points and the Cardinals and Packers combined for 96 points. I’ve embed a highlight of the game below

NBA

On this day in 1986, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar became the first player to score 34,000 points in a career.  Karl Malone is the only other player to reach that mark.

On this day in 2003, Charlotte, North Carolina was awarded an expansion franchise.  The team would be known as the Bobcats, but changed their name to the Hornets in 2014.

MLB

On this day in 1991, the Baltimore Orioles traded pitchers Curt Schilling, Pete Harnisch, and outfielder Steve Finley to the Houston Astros for first baseman Glen Davis.  Davis was a home run hitter and averaged around 27 homers while playing for Houston, but injuries plagued him the following three seasons with the Orioles and he would only hit 24 home runs during that span.  Curt Schilling went on to become one of the best pitchers in the game, winning three World Series (1 with the Diamondbacks and two with the Red Sox) and made six All-Star games.  Finley went on to win five gold gloves, appear in two All-Star games, and win a World Series with the Diamondbacks in 2001.  Harnisch went on to have a long major league career, appearing in one All-Star game.

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